Bariatric surgery Singapore: Can I still conceive after rapid weight loss?

Bariatric surgery and fertility: Can I still conceive after rapid weight loss? More than half of bariatric surgery patients are females, and of that group, about 60% are married. Many of my patients have expressed their desire to get pregnant in future and asked ifit’s safe to conceive after weight loss surgery. The short answer is yes, of course.

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Lose Weight Fast: Is Bariatric surgery the best way to do it?

Almost everyone desires a nice, svelte body that’s free of health problems. Depending on how far you’re willing to go, some attempt extreme crash diets to lose weight fast, while others take a slow and steady approach that can last from months to years. For a small pool of individuals, surgery might come to mind. 

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Femoral hernia: “Silent killer” hernia in women?

In Singapore, an inguinal hernia is the most common type of hernia in men and women; though between the two sexes, men experience this condition more. But that’s not to say women are in the clear — in fact, women who have an inguinal hernia are more likely to have a femoral hernia too. Femoral hernias are known as the “silent” hernia because they don’t usually cause symptoms and are more likely to “pinch” a part of the bowel without you knowing. As such, the risk of complications is higher.

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What is the link between obesity and a hiatal hernia?

Obesity brings a slew of medical conditions — if you are overweight or obese, I’m sure your doctor must have already told you about its associated health implications, including a hiatal hernia.

Unlike an inguinal hernia, which is typically associated with birth defects or heavy lifting, a hiatal hernia is almost exclusively known to be linked with obesity. Why so? Let’s find out more about this type of hernia and its treatment options.

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Inguinal hernia: The most common type of hernia in men and women?

As we get older, our muscles weaken, and so does our chance of developing a hernia. A hernia is generally caused by a combination of pressure and weakness of muscle, in which the pressure pushes an organ or tissue into the weak spot. Depending on where the spot is, the hernia can either be very serious or not at all.

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Gastric pain or appendicitis? Here’s how to tell

Abdominal pain can stem from a myriad of issues. Previously, I wrote about the difference between gastric pain and a stomach ulcer, in which the latter can stem from recurring gastric pain or gastritis if left untreated. Recently, I’ve been receiving a number of younger patients with bad abdominal pain and many were not able to pinpoint what exactly that pain was — though several of them thought it was gastric pain or pain caused by gas. After some tests, we found out what they were experiencing was actually appendix pain, or appendicitis.

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How do I differentiate gastric pain from a stomach ulcer?

Many stomach conditions often share the same symptoms — a dull or gnawing, burning pain in the upper part of the belly, nausea, heartburn and so on. More often than not, we’re inclined to link our abdominal pain with stomach flu or gastric pain, partly because our population is used to having recurring gastric pain attacks. That and no one would actually suspect they have a stomach ulcer — at least for the majority of my patients when I give them a diagnosis.

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Gastric Pain Singapore: What happens if it is recurring?

I’ve been asked multiple times, “Doc, is it bad if I always get gastric pain? Is having frequent gastric pain normal?” Well, the answer is no. You might think the answer to that is obvious, but many are actually unaware of the health implications frequent gastric pain brings. As a general surgeon in Singapore, I’ve noticed that the cases of gastric pain are rising, and I can only credit that to our busy lifestyles and irregular eating habits.

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Jaundice in adults: Why does it happen?

Whether you’re a parent or not, you must have heard of newborns getting jaundice and how it’s pretty normal. But jaundice in adults? How does that even happen, and is it anything serious?

Yes, I receive a handful of adult patients with jaundice — and unfortunately, jaundice in adults is often a sign of an underlying medical condition which does not improve on its own without serious side effects, unlike neonatal jaundice. Let’s find out all about adult jaundice.

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